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Republican Senator Bob Corker Says Trump’s Recklessness Threatens ‘World War III’

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Jonathan Martin and Mark Landleroct, reporting for The New York Times:

Senator Bob Corker, the Republican chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, charged in an interview on Sunday that President Trump was treating his office like “a reality show,” with reckless threats toward other countries that could set the nation “on the path to World War III.”

In an extraordinary rebuke of a president of his own party, Mr. Corker said he was alarmed about a president who acts “like he’s doing ‘The Apprentice’ or something.”

“He concerns me,” Mr. Corker added. “He would have to concern anyone who cares about our nation.” […]

All but inviting his colleagues to join him in speaking out about the president, Mr. Corker said his concerns about Mr. Trump were shared by nearly every Senate Republican.

“Look, except for a few people, the vast majority of our caucus understands what we’re dealing with here,” he said, adding that “of course they understand the volatility that we’re dealing with and the tremendous amount of work that it takes by people around him to keep him in the middle of the road.”

Even Republicans are now saying, on the record, what has been obvious all along: Trump is mentally unfit for the job — an impulsive, angry, uninformed narcissist with a tenuous hold on reality who is a menace to the nation and the world.

Contrary to Trump’s (and his followers’) incessant bleating, the news media is in fact profoundly biased for Trump by pretending he’s mentally competent. The narrative as presented on the front pages of our major newspapers is that we’re still within the bounds of normalcy: Republicans holding both houses of Congress and the White House, but unable to advance any significant legislation because of conflicts within the party.

The real story is that we’ve elected a dangerous man mentally unfit for office — quite possibly both mentally ill (narcissistic personality disorder) and suffering from the early stages of dementia — and the only people who can do something about it are the members of his own party, who refuse to do so out of fear of angering those in the electorate who for whatever reason still support Trump.

I don’t agree with Bob Corker on politics, but I admire and thank him for breaking the seal on speaking openly of Trump as mentally unfit. If Democrats say it, it can be spun as politics. When Republicans say, there’s nothing to spin.

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invinciblegod
9 days ago
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As much as I agree with this, won't Republicans who support Trump treat Bob Corker the same way as how Democrats would treat a Democratic senator for supporting Confederates/KKK/pro-life/[insert other democratic main issue]?

IE. wouldn't Republicans just say that Corker is no longer a Republican and will disregard what he says?
ahem1234
8 days ago
Already happening bub.
codesujal
7 days ago
He's also not running for re-election... makes all of this easier.
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sirshannon
8 days ago
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"the news media is in fact profoundly biased for Trump by pretending he’s mentally competent"

Man who claimed mom died in Iraq after Trump's ban lied, Imam confirms

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Posted:Feb 01 2017 02:14PM EST

Updated:Feb 01 2017 02:34PM EST

DETROIT (WJBK) - The leader of a mosque in Dearborn has confirmed to FOX 2 that a man who claimed his mother died in Iraq after being barred from returning to the United States under a ban instituted by President Trump this weekend, lied to FOX 2 about when her death occurred.

Imam Husham Al-Hussainy, leader of the Karbalaa Islamic Educational Center in Dearborn, says Mike Hager's mom did not pass away this weekend after being barred from traveling to the United States. The Imam confirms that Hager's mother died before the ban was put in place.

After the story aired on FOX 2 and was posted on <a href="http://FOX2Detroit.com" rel="nofollow">FOX2Detroit.com</a>, we received many questions about the validity of Hager's claims that his mother died waiting to be approved to come home. FOX 2 has confirmed that his mother died five days earlier.

According to Al-Hussainy, Hager's mother had kidney disease and was receiving treatment in Michigan - where she lived - before traveling to Iraq to visit family. The Imam said she passed away on January 22, 2017, five days before President Trump instituted the travel ban.

On Tuesday, Mike Hager told FOX 2 that he and his family were stopped while trying to return from Iraq to Michigan. He said that he was allowed through because of his American citizenship but his ailing mother and other family members were not. He then claimed that his mom passed away in Iraq on Saturday, as he was traveling to the United States.

Travelers from Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Libya, Yemen and Somalia are banned from traveling to the United States for 90 days so the country can detect "individuals with terrorist ties and stopping them from entering the United States."

FOX 2 is continuing to try and contact Hager for more details. 

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invinciblegod
258 days ago
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Literally not going to believe anything Fox says without confirmation since they lied about the Canada mosque shooting.
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satadru
258 days ago
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Ugh.
New York, NY

People Spent $1.6 Million on Dock that Adds Ports BACK to the MacBook Pro

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This is mind blowing when you really think about it. HyperDrive, a product created specifically to add ports back to the newest version of Apple’s MacBook Pros, has raised nearly $1.6 million from over 17,000 people desperate to undo one of Apple’s biggest hardware goofs to date.

Apple’s decision to remove ports—including the coveted SD card slot, which Phil Schiller called ‘cumbersome’—is one of the most widely criticized design decisions Apple has ever made. But it’s also been extremely lucrative for accessory makers.

In lieu of spending copious amounts of money on individual dongles from Apple, people have flocked to products like this dock and the HyperDrive, throwing money away on rolling back their ports.

There’s no way of knowing just how much money has been spent on different solutions trying to fix the MacBook Pros’ most glaring issue; but since HyperDrive is on Kickstarter, we do know how much people have spent on this one single solution: nearly $1.6 million.

At $70 each, HyperDrive isn’t necessarily a cheap fix, but it’s definitely cheaper than buying all of these ports as separate adapters. If you’re interested, you have three more days to jump on the bandwagon on Kickstarter… if you haven’t already switched back to Windows in protest.

(via Resource Magazine)

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invinciblegod
278 days ago
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You can think of this as Apple's way to help small businesses!
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emrikol
272 days ago
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#DongleTax
Linton

What’s So Bad about the Imperial System Anyway?

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As a Hackaday writer, you can never predict where the comments of your posts will go. Some posts seem to be ignored, while others have a good steady stream of useful feedback. But sometimes the comment threads just explode, heading off into seemingly uncharted territory only tangentially related to the original post.

Such was the case with [Steven Dufresne]’s recent post about decimal time, where the comments quickly became a heated debate about the relative merits of metric and imperial units. As I read the thread, I recalled any of the numerous and similarly tangential comments on various reddit threads bashing the imperial system, and decided that enough was enough. I find the hate for the imperial system largely unfounded, and so I want to rise to its defense.

Did you measure that room in 'feet', or in 'flip-flops'?
Did you measure that room in ‘feet’, or in ‘flip-flops’?

What is a system of units anyway? At its heart, is just a way to measure the world. I could very easily measure the length and width of a room using my feet, toe to heel. Most of us have probably done just that at some point, and despite the inconvenient and potentially painful problem of dealing with fractionalization of your lower appendage, it’s a totally valid if somewhat imprecise method. You could easily pace out the length of the room and replicate that measurement to cut a piece of carpet, for instance. It’s not even that much of a stretch to got to the home center and buy carpet off the roll using your personal units — you might get some strange looks, but you’ll have your personal measuring stick right with you.

The trouble comes when you try to relate your units to someone not in possession of your feet. Try to order carpet online and you’ll run into trouble. So above and beyond simply giving us the tools to measure the world, systems of units need to be standardized so that everyone is measuring the same thing. Expanding trade beyond the dominion where one could refer to the length of the king’s arm and have that make sense to the other party was a big driver of the imperial system first, and then the metric system. And it appears to be one of the big beefs people have regarding the United States’ stubborn insistence on sticking with our feet, gallons, and bushels.

How Ridiculous are We Talking?

quote-definition-of-a-meterThe argument that imperial units are based on ridiculous things like the aforementioned king’s arm? That’s not an argument when a meter was originally defined as one 10-millionth of the distance from the north pole to the equator. Even rigorously defined relative to the speed of light or the wavelength of krypton-86 emissions in a vacuum, the meter is based on phenomena that are completely inaccessible to the people who will use is, and unrelated to their daily lives. At least everyone has seen a foot that’s about a foot long.

Doing the conversions between imperial units and SI units is tedious and error prone, they say. Really? Perhaps I’d buy that argument a hundred years ago, or even fifty. But with pervasive technology that can handle millions of mathematical operations a second, there’s not much meat on that bone. I’ll grant you that it’s an extra step that wouldn’t be needed if everyone were on the same system, and that it could lead to rounding errors that would add up to quite a bit of money over lots of transactions. But even then, why is that not seen as an opportunity? Look at financial markets — billions are made every day on the “slop” in currency exchanges. I find it unlikely that someone hasn’t found a way to make money off unit conversions too.

Another point of contention I often see is that imperial units make no sense. Yes, it’s true that we have funny units like gills and hogshead and rods and chains. But so what? Most of the imperial system boils down to a few commonly used units, like feet and gallons and pounds, while the odder units that once supported specialized trades — surveyors had their rods and chains, apothecaries had their drams and grains — are largely deprecated from daily life now.

Deal with It

For the units that remain in common use, the complaint I hear frequently is, “Why should I be forced to remember that there are 5,280 feet in a statute mile? And why is there a different nautical mile? Why are there 12 inches in a foot anyway? A gallon has four quarts, why does that make sense?” And so on. My snappy retort to that is, again, “So what?” If you’re not a daily user of the imperial system, then don’t bother yourself with it. Stick to metric — we don’t care.

If you’re metrified and you’re forced to use imperial units for some reason, then do what a lot of us imperials have to do — deal with it. I’m a scientist by training, and therefore completely comfortable with the SI system. When I did bench work I had to sling around grams, liters, and meters daily. And when I drove home I saw (and largely obeyed) the speed limit signs posted in miles per hour. No problems, no awkward roadside conversations with a police officer explaining that I was still thinking in metric and thought that the 88 on my speedometer was really in km/h and I was really doing 55. If I stopped at the store to pick up a gallon of milk and a couple of pounds of ground beef for dinner, I wasn’t confused, even if I slipped a 2-liter bottle of soda into the order.

At the end of the day, I don’t really see what all the fuss is about. Imperial and metric both have their place, and each system seems to be doing its job just fine. If your argument is that imperial units are inelegant and awkward, even though you’re correct I don’t think that’s enough to sway the imperial holdouts. And if you’re just upset because we’re being stubborn and won’t join the enlightened metric masses, then I think you’re probably going to be upset for a long time to come.


Filed under: Featured, Interest, rants



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invinciblegod
278 days ago
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Yes, the solution is always to never improve anything and "deal" with a flawed system. This is exactly the same reasoning as "back in my day I had to calculate 5180 to calculate anything! Kids these days are too spoiled with their easy 1000 calculations!"

Also, don't mention things like a space probe burning up because of unit conversion mistakes.
digdoug
277 days ago
plus, you got 'em all wrong, since it's 5280 feet to a mile.
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duerig
278 days ago
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I have started working on projects that require me to deal with measurement more and more. The problem with the imperial system is not that there are a lot of names or that units are not round factors of 10. The problem is that there is not an imperial system at all.

When I buy a metric screw, each one is labeled by its measurements. An M3 screw is 3mm thick and an M16 screw is 16mm thick. If you know how long a mm is, you know how big the screw is.

If I buy an imperial screw, then there are some screws that are fractions like '1/4' and others that are large numbers like '10'. Guess which is bigger? The 1/4 screw is in inches, while the 10 is a gauge number. So there is not a screw size system, there are at least two. And these interact with multiple drill measurement systems. Sometimes you can find a 1/4" drill bit. But every drill bit also has a number or letter. How big is a Q bit? I don't know.

Material thicknesses are even more complicated. Some things like plywood have nominal sizes (3/4") but are systematically inaccurate because the actual size is 18mm thick. Plastic sheets have the same issue. Sometimes thicknesses are decimalized inches (0.125"), sometimes they are fractions. There is no continuity here.

But it gets even worse with metal sheeting. Metal sheeting is either a fairly accurate decimalized inches indicator or a gauge number. The gauge number does not consistently mean anything from sheet to sheet. A sheet of steel at 18 gauge is differently sized compared to a sheet of aluminum at 18 gauge. And both of these are different from an 18 gauge tube.

So the only sane thing to do is to convert everything into metric. Every time I deal with an imperial system, I just convert that measurement into mm and now I know what I am dealing with. That way I don't have to remember all of the incompatible systems that confusingly come under the name 'imperial'.
jepler
278 days ago
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why not like the "imperial" system? Well, today's "imperial" measurements are all defined in terms of the metric system anyway, so you're relying on the definition of a kilogram anytime you say you have a pound of something anyway. What's the alternative? Let a hundred definitions of the "mile" flourish, as they did 150 years ago: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mile#/media/File:Wegmasse1.png (a partial list of different definitions of the "mile", but in old german script as a special bonus)
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm

Carson’s Prepared Testimony For HUD Hearing Contained Plagiarism

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The opening testimony that Ben Carson, Donald Trump’s pick to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development, prepared for his Thursday confirmation hearing contained word-for-word plagiarism, according to the Washington Post.

The Senate Banking Committee never heard the plagiarized text, however, because Carson resorted to his characteristic off-the-cuff style in his oral testimony, departing almost entirely from his prepared remarks.

The two paragraphs in question focused on the health problems caused by lead exposure in young children. According to the Post, they were taken verbatim from “Where We Live Matters For Our Health,” a 2008 report from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

A Trump transition spokeswoman told the newspaper that the plagiarized text was mistakenly included, and that Carson never intended to read it at his hearing.

“It was a written statement for the record — his oral testimony, as I am sure you’ve heard, is extemporaneous and planned that way,” the spokeswoman said in a statement to the Post. “The original written statement was sourced with hyperlinks and footnotes, but unfortunately that seems to have fallen off.”

The Post said no such sourcing was included in the copies of prepared text passed out to reporters at the hearing.

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invinciblegod
278 days ago
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This is the sort of non news that make people distrust the media. So he DIDN'T use it??? Then why the fuck do we care?
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Illumina wants to sequence your whole genome for $100

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invinciblegod
280 days ago
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No Joke, I thought this said "Illuminati wants your genome"
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